Photo: Patricia Sevilla Ciordia http://pscfoto.net

Intro

If you follow us on Instagram, you may have had a little peek at the Royal Enfield Shotgun 650 already, either at the release event last month, or maybe you saw the stories this weekend. I got to test ride it for the weekend, and what fun I had!

The fourth motorcycle in the line-up on the 650 twin platform sits somewhere between its siblings, literally. The Super Meteor 650, with its more laidback, cruiser riding position, sits on one end of the spectrum. The Continental GT and the Interceptor on the other with a sportier, forward-leaning position. The Shotgun fits right in the middle, with a comfortable, upright riding position, allowing for a 90 degree bend in the knees. 

Photo: Patricia Sevilla Ciordia http://pscfoto.net

First Impressions

The engine is what we expect from Royal Enfield, a 648cc twin without annoying vibrations and a meaty midrange. It pulls away nicely, and you would not know that you’re sitting on 240kg of steel with only 47 horsepower. This is due to the evenly spaced gear ratios. The power is always there. Further, due to the 25.3 degrees rake angle and the 18” front wheel, it is easy to tip the bike into corners and with its low centre of gravity, you’ll be scraping pegs before you know it! And if it gets too exciting, the 320mm front and 300mm rear brake with dual piston calipers do their job. They are perfectly adequate for city riding and country lane touring.

Photo: Patricia Sevilla Ciordia http://pscfoto.net

Riding Experience

The reliable twin gets up to highway speeds easily, and sits there comfortably. And this without a wind or fly screen! I blame the comfortable riding position. The seat sits at 790mm, and for my tall ostrich legs, I could do with a few more centimeters of padding, especially after a few hours in the saddle. This butt-numbing experience was exacerbated by the rear shocks being set up for an average rider weight. Something I have never reached. The front end is a whole other story, the 5-step adjustable upside down Showa forks handle any unevenness in the road surface well. Trust me, I have put the suspension to the test. Some of the roads in the countryside in Berlin give the impression that they were last maintained when the wall was still up. With all that mixed riding, it still only used 6.6L/100km. And I am sure you can get a lot more out of it when you’re cruising at a leisurely 100-110 km/h. I will not let my sore bottoms affect my judgment of the bike, it is just a head’s up for those that do not fit into the average rider category to consider making some adjustments.

Photo: Patricia Sevilla Ciordia http://pscfoto.net

A Platform for Customisation

And that brings me to what this bike really is. A base, a platform, a blank canvas. But a really cool looking one to start with. The Royal Enfield Shotgun 650 comes in Sheet Metal Grey (€7590), Drill Green and Plasma Blue (€7690), or a two-tone Stencil White (€7790). The slogan for this model is “Inspired by custom. For custom.” Royal Enfield really invites and encourages you to give this bike a personal touch. To get started with that, they offer 31 additional parts to mix and match to your liking. I can really recommend the round bar end mirrors. Not only do they complete the look, they function too! Because, looks first, safety second! No wait, safety first! The finish of these mirrors is excellent, and I think they complete the look of the bobber. Further accessories include indicators, seats, crash bars, and even billet aluminium wheel sets (hot!). What is missing in my book: exhaust options! I would love to see how a shorter, sportier exhaust would look! I like the dull sound of the pea shooters, it is decent and pleasant for city riding, and it does generate a nice roar when you open up the throttle. What I would be keen to try is the bolt-on subframe with luggage rack and pillion seat. This innovative design allows you to switch between practical setups without compromising the style in no-time.


Photo: Casper van der Ven

Photo: Casper van der Ven

Nifty gadget

Talking about practicality, Royal Enfield has developed an app that connects to the bike via BlueTooth. You can tuck away your phone, charge it in the onboard USB socket, and it will send directions from the app to the turn-by-turn digital navigation unit. A neat feature, and especially in the city it functions really well! The app is based on Google Maps, and includes the “avoid highways/tolls/ferries”-options. Well done Royal Enfield! 

Photo: Casper van der Ven @Craftwerk Berlin

Photo: Casper van der Ven @Craftwerk Berlin

Conclusion

In all, I had a really great time on the Royal Enfield Shotgun 650. It is surprisingly nimble for a bike in its weight class, the comfortable riding position allows both for relaxed cruising/touring and more active riding, and the engine is smooth. An excellent bike for people looking to get (back) on a bike, for people who want to express themselves and their creativity without having to learn how to weld or fabricate parts, and for people who just want a reliable, comfortable, and fun ride without breaking the bank! 

 

Photo: Patricia Sevilla Ciordia http://pscfoto.net

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About the Author: Casper van der Ven

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Photo: Patricia Sevilla Ciordia http://pscfoto.net

Intro

If you follow us on Instagram, you may have had a little peek at the Royal Enfield Shotgun 650 already, either at the release event last month, or maybe you saw the stories this weekend. I got to test ride it for the weekend, and what fun I had!

The fourth motorcycle in the line-up on the 650 twin platform sits somewhere between its siblings, literally. The Super Meteor 650, with its more laidback, cruiser riding position, sits on one end of the spectrum. The Continental GT and the Interceptor on the other with a sportier, forward-leaning position. The Shotgun fits right in the middle, with a comfortable, upright riding position, allowing for a 90 degree bend in the knees. 

Photo: Patricia Sevilla Ciordia http://pscfoto.net

First Impressions

The engine is what we expect from Royal Enfield, a 648cc twin without annoying vibrations and a meaty midrange. It pulls away nicely, and you would not know that you’re sitting on 240kg of steel with only 47 horsepower. This is due to the evenly spaced gear ratios. The power is always there. Further, due to the 25.3 degrees rake angle and the 18” front wheel, it is easy to tip the bike into corners and with its low centre of gravity, you’ll be scraping pegs before you know it! And if it gets too exciting, the 320mm front and 300mm rear brake with dual piston calipers do their job. They are perfectly adequate for city riding and country lane touring.

Photo: Patricia Sevilla Ciordia http://pscfoto.net

Riding Experience

The reliable twin gets up to highway speeds easily, and sits there comfortably. And this without a wind or fly screen! I blame the comfortable riding position. The seat sits at 790mm, and for my tall ostrich legs, I could do with a few more centimeters of padding, especially after a few hours in the saddle. This butt-numbing experience was exacerbated by the rear shocks being set up for an average rider weight. Something I have never reached. The front end is a whole other story, the 5-step adjustable upside down Showa forks handle any unevenness in the road surface well. Trust me, I have put the suspension to the test. Some of the roads in the countryside in Berlin give the impression that they were last maintained when the wall was still up. With all that mixed riding, it still only used 6.6L/100km. And I am sure you can get a lot more out of it when you’re cruising at a leisurely 100-110 km/h. I will not let my sore bottoms affect my judgment of the bike, it is just a head’s up for those that do not fit into the average rider category to consider making some adjustments.

Photo: Patricia Sevilla Ciordia http://pscfoto.net

A Platform for Customisation

And that brings me to what this bike really is. A base, a platform, a blank canvas. But a really cool looking one to start with. The Royal Enfield Shotgun 650 comes in Sheet Metal Grey (€7590), Drill Green and Plasma Blue (€7690), or a two-tone Stencil White (€7790). The slogan for this model is “Inspired by custom. For custom.” Royal Enfield really invites and encourages you to give this bike a personal touch. To get started with that, they offer 31 additional parts to mix and match to your liking. I can really recommend the round bar end mirrors. Not only do they complete the look, they function too! Because, looks first, safety second! No wait, safety first! The finish of these mirrors is excellent, and I think they complete the look of the bobber. Further accessories include indicators, seats, crash bars, and even billet aluminium wheel sets (hot!). What is missing in my book: exhaust options! I would love to see how a shorter, sportier exhaust would look! I like the dull sound of the pea shooters, it is decent and pleasant for city riding, and it does generate a nice roar when you open up the throttle. What I would be keen to try is the bolt-on subframe with luggage rack and pillion seat. This innovative design allows you to switch between practical setups without compromising the style in no-time.


Photo: Casper van der Ven

Photo: Casper van der Ven

Nifty gadget

Talking about practicality, Royal Enfield has developed an app that connects to the bike via BlueTooth. You can tuck away your phone, charge it in the onboard USB socket, and it will send directions from the app to the turn-by-turn digital navigation unit. A neat feature, and especially in the city it functions really well! The app is based on Google Maps, and includes the “avoid highways/tolls/ferries”-options. Well done Royal Enfield! 

Photo: Casper van der Ven @Craftwerk Berlin

Photo: Casper van der Ven @Craftwerk Berlin

Conclusion

In all, I had a really great time on the Royal Enfield Shotgun 650. It is surprisingly nimble for a bike in its weight class, the comfortable riding position allows both for relaxed cruising/touring and more active riding, and the engine is smooth. An excellent bike for people looking to get (back) on a bike, for people who want to express themselves and their creativity without having to learn how to weld or fabricate parts, and for people who just want a reliable, comfortable, and fun ride without breaking the bank! 

 

Photo: Patricia Sevilla Ciordia http://pscfoto.net

Share This Story, Choose Your Platform!

About the Author: Casper van der Ven

Leave A Comment

For security, use of Google's reCAPTCHA service is required which is subject to the Google Privacy Policy and Terms of Use.

Tags