BikeBrewers.com https://bikebrewers.com Café Racer, Scrambler, Bratstyle & other Custom Bikes. Fri, 24 Feb 2017 08:32:55 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://bikebrewers.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/11/cropped-wrench-black1-32x32.png BikeBrewers.com https://bikebrewers.com 32 32 99704792 Husqvarna Nuda 900R Supermoto by TripleSpeed https://bikebrewers.com/husqvarna-nuda-900r-supermoto/ https://bikebrewers.com/husqvarna-nuda-900r-supermoto/#respond Fri, 24 Feb 2017 08:31:03 +0000 https://bikebrewers.com/?p=5149 Right at a moment where I started thinking that Husqvarna seemed to be a little underexposed, I’ve found another cool custom Husky to feature here (don’t forget to check this one and this one).  This bike right here is based on the incredible Husqvarna Nuda 900R. In my opinion, a pretty underestimated machine considering the […]

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Nuda 900R Supermoto 11Right at a moment where I started thinking that Husqvarna seemed to be a little underexposed, I’ve found another cool custom Husky to feature here (don’t forget to check this one and this one).  This bike right here is based on the incredible Husqvarna Nuda 900R. In my opinion, a pretty underestimated machine considering the sales numbers. The bike is full of high-end parts and is powered by a modified 2 cylinder engine of the strong BMW F800. A 100% “build for fun machine” with a low weight, around 103hp and an incredible amount of torque (100Nm). The original concept is a mix between a sports bike and a supermoto, the latter as the dominant factor. If you’ve ridden one, you know what I mean. It’s pretty spectacular.

This machine is built by TripleSpeed from Germany and they’ve kept the most of the original concept in place, but radicalized it. Owners of TripleSpeed,  Michael “Obi” Obringer and Jens Hebisch (an ex-carpenter and an ex-banker!) stuffed the with the best parts in the industry: the handlebar and mirrors are from Rizoma, the dash and electronics are from MotoGadget, brake and clutch pumps are from Magura and the exhaust comes from Remus. To give some more “kick” a Dynojet PowerCommander is used.

The suspension is custom made by Zupin, the importer of Mupo Suspension systems. To underline the multi-purpose of this bike, the Roadtec 01 all-terrain tires from Metzeler are used. The whole packed in a hundred percent dark TripleSpeed style and rounded off with noble matt carbon and a lot of heart blood.

They compare the result as a prescription drug and called it “Parox”. I think I’ll head over to my doctor…

Nuda 900R Supermoto 12

Nuda 900R Supermoto 13

Nuda 900R Supermoto 10 Nuda 900R Supermoto 8

Nuda 900R Supermoto 15 Nuda 900R Supermoto 14 Nuda 900R Supermoto 7

Nuda 900R Supermoto 2 Nuda 900R Supermoto 3

 

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Yamaha TRX850 Cafe Racer https://bikebrewers.com/yamaha-trx850-cafe-racer/ https://bikebrewers.com/yamaha-trx850-cafe-racer/#respond Thu, 23 Feb 2017 08:39:41 +0000 https://bikebrewers.com/?p=5123 It was no secret that the Yamaha TRX850 was meant as a direct competitor of the Ducati 900SS. Just like the Duc, the TRX850 had a 2 cylinder engine in a tube frame, a sporty riding position and a bikini fairing. The most exciting about the TRX was its engine. It was based on the […]

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Yamaha TRX850 Cafe Racer 10

It was no secret that the Yamaha TRX850 was meant as a direct competitor of the Ducati 900SS. Just like the Duc, the TRX850 had a 2 cylinder engine in a tube frame, a sporty riding position and a bikini fairing. The most exciting about the TRX was its engine. It was based on the Yamaha TDM850 and had 5 valves per cylinder (3 in and 2 out) but the TRX was the first production motorcycle with a 270°  crank (or 90° if you prefer) with the so called “crossplane” technology. With this the parallel twin produced sound and feeling of a V-twin. A technology Yamaha also used for the Yamaha XSR700 which results in a great power band. The 80hp and 85Nm are available at very low RPM’s.

Unlike the 900SS, the TRX was not a big sales hit, but amongst motorcycle lovers the bike is called one of the “best kept secrets” and a “forgotten gem”. Bespoke furniture maker Seb Hipperson from Londen had that same love for the TRX and decided to build his own TRX850 Cafe Racer. Watch and enjoy! The bike will be present at the Bike Shed 2017.

Yamaha TRX850 Cafe Racer Yamaha TRX850 Cafe Racer 4Yamaha TRX850 Cafe Racer 3 Yamaha TRX850 Cafe Racer 2 Yamaha TRX850 Cafe Racer 5 Yamaha TRX850 Cafe Racer 6 Yamaha TRX850 Cafe Racer 7 Yamaha TRX850 Cafe Racer 8 Yamaha TRX850 Cafe Racer 9

 

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Top 10 Ducati Cafe Racers https://bikebrewers.com/ducati-cafe-racer/ https://bikebrewers.com/ducati-cafe-racer/#respond Tue, 21 Feb 2017 19:14:05 +0000 https://bikebrewers.com/?p=5041 A Ducati Cafe Racer is probably one of the most desirable custom motorcycles. A combination of the exclusive Italian brand with a strong heritage and the classic looks of a vintage racer. The last few years, Ducati aims to be part of the ever-growing custom motorcycle scene with their Ducati Scrambler. The Scrambler offers a strong […]

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Ducati Cafe Racer

A Ducati Cafe Racer is probably one of the most desirable custom motorcycles. A combination of the exclusive Italian brand with a strong heritage and the classic looks of a vintage racer. The last few years, Ducati aims to be part of the ever-growing custom motorcycle scene with their Ducati Scrambler. The Scrambler offers a strong base for customization, and Ducati offers a wide range of variations. In the beginning of 2017, they even launched the Scrambler Cafe Racer; a turnkey machine combining modern day technology with the classic vintage racer look. But even back in 2003, Ducati already had a modern cafe racer with their Ducati SportClassic (which still is one of the best machines I guess).

Enough about stock bikes though, let’s take a look at the best custom built Ducati Cafe Racers I’ve found to date! This is a subjective list and if you think that a bike should be listed, let me know!

#10: Ducati Pantah 600 by XTR Pepo

Ducati-XTR-Pepo

November 2015 – If you search around the web for custom Ducati’s, I’m sure that you’ll stumble upon some machine by the hand of Jose Rosell, a.k.a. Pepo. Jose has created an impressive list of custom motorcycles and he simply keeps on going strong. Jose was part of the former Radical Ducati, so he has a strong relationship with the Italian brand. After Radical Ducati, Jose started his own workshop called XTR Pepo.

The bike I’ve listed here is a real classic Ducati cafe racer, based on a 1983 Ducati Pantah 600. The bike is called Bol d’Or as a reference of its endurance-theme, a style Jose uses a lot for his projects. [more images]

#9: Ducati 900SS “Barn Built” Cafe Racer

Ducati 900SS Cafe Racer

October 2015 – The title may be a bit misleading, since this Ducati 900SS Cafe Racer is not a barn-built machine, it’s only referring to the name of the workshop: Barn Built Machines from Belgium. It’s the combination of the beautiful half fairing, laced wheels, color scheme and upgrades that make this Ducati one of a kind. I think that this bike definitely deserves a spot in this list. [more images]

#8: Ducati Scrambler “Hero 01” by Holographic Hammer

Holographic Hammer Hero 01

June 2015 – This project was initiated by Ducati France for the annual Wheels & Waves festival in Biarritz. It’s the result of a cooperation of Holographic Hammer (a design studio) and Moto Heroes from France. Holographic Hammer, known for the concept images got the chance to put one of their projects into life. It’s based on a Ducati Scrambler and is stuffed with high-end parts and components. A modern machine with a classic cafe racer twist.  [more images]

#7: Ducati Sport1000 by Walzwerk Racing

Ducati Sport 1000 -Louis 75- by WalzWerk-Racing 01December 2012 – A tribute to Detlef Louis (owner/founder of the German Louis.de, a major motorcycle parts dealer) based on the Ducati Sport1000 and called, how obvious, “Louis 75”. Louis himself asked Marcus Walz from Walzwerk racing to build a custom Ducati Sport with “a combination of tradition and future”. Since Detlef will be celebrating his 80th birthday this year, I hope to see another creation like this. [more images]

#6: Ducati 900SS by Wimoto

Ducati 900SS Cafe Racer

September 2016 – As a proud “Dutchie” I’m happy to list this awesome Ducati 900SS Cafe Racer built by Wimoto. Master builder Wido Veldkamp built this machine for one of his customers and had two clear objectives: reduce weight and improve performance. Project “Wheels of Fortune” was born. Wido managed to drop the total weight with 35kg (!) to just under 150kg. Together with some serious frame adjustments and improved suspension, the overall handling of the bike is improved. [more images]

#5: Ducati 750SS “Imola Evo” by Vee Two

Ducati 750SS by Vee Two 6

January 2017 – A bike from Down Under with pure racing genes. Built on their own designed “Ritorno” engine with a genuine ’81 900 MHR frame, this “Emola Evo” by VeeTwo is a classic racer built for the track. Great lines and high-performance parts make this bike not only look good, it’s also capable of doing serious lap times.

While it’s based on the 750SS, technically speaking this is a brand new bike build around a genuine ’81 900 MHR frame. Though heavily modified: they narrowed the steering angle, shortened the wheel base 100mm, cut off the rear, relocated engine brackets and removed all unnecessary brackets and of course put that beloved Ritorno engine in place. [more images]

#4: Ducati Sport Classic by Corse Motorcycles

Ducati Sport Classic Cafe Racer (1)November 2013 – A beautiful machine based on the already cool Sport Classic 1000 and built by Anthony Warnock, a former SB/GP mechanic. With over 10 years of experience and some “job hops”, Anthony decided in 2012 to start his own custom workshop; Corse Motorcycles. A built that utilized the original concept of the Sport Classic, with some real high-end upgrades and a design to die for. Or better in Anthony’s words: “it’s subtle but unique, sounds and rides beautiful and draws a crowd where ever it’s parked.” Cheers to that! [more images]

#3: Ducati Scrambler “Fuel Strada 800” by Fuel Motorcycles

Fuel Strada 800

September 2016 – This Ducati is built by Fuel Bespoke Motorcycle from Barcelona, Spain as a submission by Ducati Spain for the “Custom Rumble” project: a contest by Ducati to show the world what possibilities the Scrambler has. The so-called “Fuel Strada 800” is one of the five finalists in this contest and really is a piece of art. Inspired by the 900SS from the 70’s, Fuel delivered a real classic looking cafe racer with modern technology. [more images]

#2: Ducati Pantah 350 by Capêlos Garage

Ducati Pantah 350 Café Racer by Capêlos Garage July 2016 – Another bike based on a legendary Ducati Pantah, but this based on a 350 model. In terms of aesthetics I think that this is not only one of the best looking Ducati cafe racers, but also one of the best looking cafe racers in general. It’s A Ducati in the mix with a Cagiva resulted in this “350 Pantah”. The bike drew a lot of attention during the 2016 Bike Shed London and melted down social media.

The bike finished #5 in our Top 10 Customs of 2016 and deserves a top spot on this list too. It’s built by Nuno Capêlo from Capêlo Garage [more images]

#1: Ducati 848 “Evo Racer” by NCT Motorcycles

Ducati 848 Evo Racer 1

January 2017 – While this may be the latest Ducati Cafe Racer in this list, I’ve listed it #1. NCT Motorcycles from Austria simply hit a sweet spot with their “Evo Racer” a mixture between a high-performance modern sports bike and a classic look. It’s based on a Ducati 848 (!), good for 140 horses on the rear wheel… It may be not a 100% vintage cafe racer (I think that adding laced wheels will make it just perfect, but that’s just my opinion), I’m pretty sure that the “racer” in this bike is obvious. [more images]

So that’s it: my personal Top 10 of Ducati cafe racers, I hope you like it and if you have any suggestions, feel free to comment!

PS. Are you more up for a Honda cafe racer? Check out my Top 10 of Honda CB Cafe Racers.

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Husqvarna 256 “THAGE” by 6/5/4 Motors https://bikebrewers.com/husqvarna-256/ https://bikebrewers.com/husqvarna-256/#respond Mon, 20 Feb 2017 09:52:31 +0000 https://bikebrewers.com/?p=5053 Snow and motorcycles are not a great combination but with the right material you can have a lot of fun in the snow on 2 wheels. Last week LOON proved that with their ice cool Husqvarna 501 Tracker. And if you live in an area where you can expect several months of snow, you have to be […]

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Husqvarna 256 by 654 Motors 16Snow and motorcycles are not a great combination but with the right material you can have a lot of fun in the snow on 2 wheels. Last week LOON proved that with their ice cool Husqvarna 501 Tracker. And if you live in an area where you can expect several months of snow, you have to be a bit creative if you want to ride your bike in winters too. Johan & Johan from 6/5/4/ Motors in Stockholm ditched up an old concept from Husqvarna. Back in 1968 the Swedish defense bought 1000 Husqvarna 256 (or MC256) motorcycles with an option to add ski’s.

Husqvarna 256 by 654 Motors 12

They’ve found this old Husqvarna 256 and decided to restore it to its original concept with a modern tracker flavor. The original Husqvarna 256 was equipped with a 256cc two-stroke engine pushing out 15hp combined with a four-speed gearbox. Since the bike could be equipped with ski’s, shifting was integrated in the lever. The ski’s would automatically sprang up if they were not pushed down. Its successor, the MC258 got an automatic gearbox. Unfortunately, the 1000 bikes for the army were the only ones produced, so the bike was pretty expensive to maintain due to the lack of affordable spare parts. From the 258, 3000 machines were manufactured.

Johan & Johan stayed pretty close the the original concept, but gave it their own twist.
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The original Husqvarna 256:

Husqvarna 256

Husqvarna 256 Gallery

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Motorcycle Tool Kit – What To Pack? https://bikebrewers.com/motorcycle-tool-kit/ https://bikebrewers.com/motorcycle-tool-kit/#respond Fri, 17 Feb 2017 14:31:23 +0000 http://bikebrewers.com/?p=5014 If you think Gremlins are just a fury story from a Spielberg movie, think again. They’re real and they live inside your bike, just waiting to pounce at the least opportune moment. A compact motorcycle tool kit is not something you can do a top end re-build with, it’s basically what we might need to get […]

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Motorcycle Tool Kit

If you think Gremlins are just a fury story from a Spielberg movie, think again. They’re real and they live inside your bike, just waiting to pounce at the least opportune moment.

A compact motorcycle tool kit is not something you can do a top end re-build with, it’s basically what we might need to get us off the side of the road. So, with that in mind, let’s take a good look at what realistically needs to be packed.

If you ride your own built cafe racer or an oldtimer, chances are that you’ve already been confronted with a breakdown at the side of the road. But owners of modern classics (but also other bikes of course) should also be aware! Regardless of what the manufacturer’s blurb tells you about your new all singing, all dancing hyper-bike, with its fly by wire and onboard computerized mega-brain reliability, out there on the open road you are at the mercy of a scientific phenomenon called Murphy’s Law.

This simply states, that if something can go t#ts up, it probably will. So, what can you do if something breaks, leaks, snaps or loosens when you’re out in the big bad world? Unless it happens right outside a 5-star resort that’s having a ‘free stay’ offer, you need to ‘sort it’. But the real answer is multi-layered, which calls for a degree of realism and some good old fashioned homework.

According to popular vehicle breakdown services, the top 10 motorcycle breakdowns (accident, mechanical failure/ ECU failure aside) are pretty much avoidable with regular maintenance, or at the very least, a seriously good once over prior to your road trip. So, put a little effort in before you go, it could save you time spent on the side of the road.

So, the question is, what ‘get me going’ motorcycle tool kit do I need with me? Obviously, this will rely solely on your bike and the best time to take appraisal of the kind of kit you’ll need, is when doing your pre-trip checks and maintenance, such as checking fluids, tire pressures and cable operations etc. That’s the time to get over, under and around your bike. Remember, the best toolkit is a redundant one, so prevention is better than cure.

Motorcycle Tool Kit Essentials

Motorcycle Tool Kit Essentials

As space is going to be limited, here’s where you need to do your homework. First have a good look at your engine fasteners. Are they all Allen keys? Are they all the same size? If so, you don’t need an actual Allen key set (1), just the one or maybe two. Do that over the whole bike and keep a look out for special fastenings like Torx bolts, that need their own special tool (2)!

Next on the list are the external nuts and bolts. You might get away with a single spanner (3) but if not, buy a good quality short-handled adjustable spanner (4), or better still, a multi fit socket (5). These are brilliant as they have a series of pins inside the socket head that adjust to any fastener size between 7-19mm. They’re usually ½” drive, but if you buy one with a drill adaptor, this is just a small extension piece that takes the drive down to ⅜”. So, if you don’t want to take a short-handled socket wrench, you can use the adjustable spanner. That, or just find an Allen key that fits the back of the socket and voila – a socket set in two pieces.

A screwdriver is another essential, and these days, you can get the most amazing multi bit screwdrivers (6), with heads that fit inside the handle. The bits you need are a tiny slot head for electrical repair, a large slot head (7) and a large and small Phillips. You can even get them with Torx and Allen key bits and if you get one of these, you can get rid of the separate Allen key and Torx key mentioned above. Like I say, this is all down to homework and the more you do, the more compact you can get your road kit.

Last but definitely not least, is a good quality multi-tool (8). These are great pieces of kit and worth their weight in gold. There’s lots of these on the market, so once again see what they come with. Do you really need a pull-out teeny weeny axe? Great for chopping-up pasta but pretty useless in the real world. I actually carry two. The first is a Victorinox Swiss Tool X, all the fold out tools are nice and sturdy as you’d expect, but the pliers are heavy duty. The second is a Leatherman Skeletool, these are cooler than a penguin’s pants and earn their place on every one of my trips, simply because the carabiner which I snap-on to a belt loop, also doubles as a bottle opener. The rule of thumb with all of the above is a simple one, buy the best quality tools you can afford.

Other Useful Items To Pack

Motorcycle Tool Kit Essentials 2

So, with the addition of some nylon zip ties (1), spark plug tool (2), a small torch (3) (one with a head strap is ideal) and a small roll of electrical tape (4), that’s the tool side of things pretty much taken care of. But it’s not quite the end of the story. 

Common sense dictates that you also carry some consumables. Have a look at your fuse block and take one of each size (5). Next come the bulbs (6), you have to have a headlight and tail light that’s a given, spare indicator bulbs you can live without if room is very tight, as you can always go old school and stick out your arm. And pack your bulbs into a hard-plastic case to stop them breaking. I also carry a small strip of block connectors (7), which you can cut into singles. These are very handy as a trip usually means luggage, a pillion passenger and this extra weight can wear through wires.

Once again, anything else depends entirely on your motorcycle. Take a clutch and throttle cable if its applicable, personally I take a couple of solderless nipples (8), as cables almost always go at the ends. Chain drive? Then you need a link splitter (9) and spare link. Pack some inches of a fuel hose (10). Take a spare spark plug (11), you don’t need a gap adjuster, the knife on your multi-tool will suffice if you’re careful.

As for tires, check your bike and get the right repair kit (12). Some can tackle tubed and tubeless (so check what tires you’re riding!), but the most important thing it needs is a CO2 canister to inflate the tire, or you aren’t going anywhere. Don’t worry if you’ve never had to plug a tire or fix a chain before, YouTube is brilliant for ‘how to’ vids and if you find yourself out with other bikers, talk to them and ask what kit they take on big trips (you will need a mobile internet connection for that!).

Motorcycle Tool Roll

Last top tip, buy a tool roll to stick all your kit in. There are beautiful canvas and leather tool rolls for sale. If you’re a cheapskate like me though, borrow one of your kids pencil cases and don’t forget to pack it handy.

However, if the thought of getting your hands dirty fills you with dread, all is not lost. There’s a tool kit just for you and it consists of merely two items. A corkscrew for your Chateau Mouton-Rothschild and the phone number of a breakdown recovery service on speed dial! Cheers! 

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Honda CB200T Brat “Surf-N-Turf” https://bikebrewers.com/honda-cb200t-brat/ https://bikebrewers.com/honda-cb200t-brat/#respond Wed, 15 Feb 2017 06:25:34 +0000 http://bikebrewers.com/?p=4989 Somehow motorcycles and surfing are two subcultures very close to each other. The annual Wheels & Waves Festival in Biarritz is probably the best example of the two cultures coming together. Chris Tope from Bellingham (MA, USA) is a guy standing with one foot in the motorcycle scene and the other one in the surfing scene. When […]

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Honda CB200T Brat 2

Somehow motorcycles and surfing are two subcultures very close to each other. The annual Wheels & Waves Festival in Biarritz is probably the best example of the two cultures coming together. Chris Tope from Bellingham (MA, USA) is a guy standing with one foot in the motorcycle scene and the other one in the surfing scene. When he got his hands on a bad shaped Honda CB200t from 1975, he decided to restore and modify this machine, make it “beach worthy” and able to carry his surf board. Project “Surf-N- Turf” was born.

Honda CB200T Brat 5

The surf board rack is built out of stainless steel tubing, painted black and wrapped in double stitched Relicate black leather to protect the surf board during riding as well as brown leather straps to compliment the custom leather seat, handlebar bracket and tool bag.

Honda CB200T Brat

The modifications on the bike include transforming all chrome parts into powder coated black or brushed metal, Progressive front end suspension and custom rear end Hagon Shocks, aluminum fabricated seat pan, trimmed and modified frame, fenders, levers, grips and handlebars. The vintage 70’s sunrise yellow tank was what sold me on the bike so he had it repainted to the exact color but with modified hand painted pin striping. Joker Machine sent various fabricated pieces for showcasing on the bike. Chris pulled the motor and fully restored internally along with changing the color scheme for an OEM, yet brat/scrambler look. The side covers were hand painted and pinstriped by a friend of Chris out of upstate New York who collaborated on the idea of the “59”, paying homage to the era of fabrication and custom builds of his time. He outfitted the bike with rugged tread tires, perfect for riding right up to the best surf spots.

Chris’ “Surf-N-Turf” won Best in Show at Rice-O-Rama in Spencer, MA, People’s Choice Award at the Welcome East Show in Portsmouth, NH, was featured in the Motorcyclists Post Oct 2016 edition and in Rider Magazine Jan 2017 edition, and just recently pictured in the 025 volume of Iron & Air magazine.

Honda CB200T Brat 7 Honda CB200T Brat 6 Honda CB200T Brat 4 Honda CB200T Brat 3

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Kawasaki W650 Brat by Kevils Speed Shop https://bikebrewers.com/kawasaki-w650-brat/ https://bikebrewers.com/kawasaki-w650-brat/#respond Tue, 14 Feb 2017 02:59:41 +0000 http://bikebrewers.com/?p=4969 Last week I’ve featured this awesome custom Kawasaki W800 and I was complaining about the fact that the I only see a few Kawasaki W-series being customized. Call it a coincidence or just randomness, but today I’ve found another custom W. This time it’s a cool looking Kawasaki W650 Brat built by Kevils Speeds Shop […]

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Kawasaki W650 Brat 3Last week I’ve featured this awesome custom Kawasaki W800 and I was complaining about the fact that the I only see a few Kawasaki W-series being customized. Call it a coincidence or just randomness, but today I’ve found another custom W. This time it’s a cool looking Kawasaki W650 Brat built by Kevils Speeds Shop from the UK.

Kawasaki W650 Brat 6Kawasaki W650 Brat 7

It’s numbered as “Moto#18” and the result of a plan to build more affordable custom bikes based on Japanese bikes. The base bike was sourced by one of their local dealers and only covered 10,000 miles the last 12 years.

They’ve wanted to give the bike a “California style” and a minimalistic look. The original sub frame was simply cut off to place a typical brat style seat. In order to relocate the wiring, air box and battery, a smaller box below the new custom box was fabricated, which also contains a MotoGadget M-Unit. The original gas tank is replaced with a smaller 70s model (Kawasaki KH100). The wheels, hubs and spokes are completely black with some classic Firestone rubber, which gives a cool contrast with the creamy frame.

The engine was soda-blasted and worn out parts got replaced. When the gas tank came back from the painter Kevil was not happy with the result and looked for “more vintage” in it. So he grabbed a scotch pad and simply started rubbing, which resulted in this cool “vintage platina”.

Kawasaki W650 Brat 10 Kawasaki W650 Brat 9 Kawasaki W650 Brat 8 Kawasaki W650 Brat 5 Kawasaki W650 Brat 4 Kawasaki W650 Brat 2Kawasaki W650 Brat

 

 

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Husqvarna 501 Tracker by Loon Cycleworks https://bikebrewers.com/husqvarna-501-tracker-loon-cycleworks/ https://bikebrewers.com/husqvarna-501-tracker-loon-cycleworks/#respond Mon, 13 Feb 2017 08:31:24 +0000 http://bikebrewers.com/?p=4953 Riding off road really is fun to do and if you’re not that worried about cold and snow, you can have a lot of fun in winters too! Just grab an enduro our MX machine and throw yourself around. Try it! It’s cool (and not only because of the low temperatures). But you can also […]

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Husqvarna BS501 Tracker 2

Riding off road really is fun to do and if you’re not that worried about cold and snow, you can have a lot of fun in winters too! Just grab an enduro our MX machine and throw yourself around. Try it! It’s cool (and not only because of the low temperatures). But you can also add some more style and build a machine yourself, just like this cool Husqvarna 501 Tracker by LOON Cycleworks called “BS501”.

It’s based on a Husqvarna FE501 which is pretty light (111kg dry) and has a real punchy 510cc single cylinder to get you going on places where’s nobody’s coming.

Husqvarna BS501 Tracker 3

The fuel tank is made of 1.5 mm thick sheet metal and especially manufactured to house the original fuel pump. The seat consists of an aluminum panel with a leather cover. The seat also covers up the electrics and is held by a powder coated sub-frame. The sub-frame itself consists of 18mm steel pipe and the 1.5 mm thick rear fender attaches straight to it. The rear brake light is attached just below the fender. An Acrapovic titanium slip-on rounds off the rear of the bike. In order to lower the front end, the WP suspension was shortened 50 mm. Thereby obtaining a lower point of gravity to enhance the on road performance. To illuminate your ride in the dark, we attached a bright LED front light with an especially designed lamp housing. The scrambler version of the LOON BS 501 comes with 2.15X18” wheels and Heindenau tires.

You think a scrambler is too boring? Or are you in to have some fun at a trackday? No problem, just swap the wheels, to a set of tubeless Alpina supermoto (3,5×16,5″ / 5×17″) wheels, along with a Magura radial brake cylinder with a 4 piston brake caliper.

The guys from LOON created a bolt-on kit which is available for your Husqvarna 501 or KTM. So if you’re bored of your stock Husqvarna or even KTM, you should take a look at this kit.

Follow LOON Cycleworks:

Website |Facebook Instagram

Husqvarna BS501 Tracker 4Husqvarna BS501 Tracker 11Husqvarna BS501 Tracker 5 Husqvarna BS501 Tracker 6 Husqvarna BS501 Tracker 7 Husqvarna BS501 Tracker 8 Husqvarna BS501 Tracker 9 Husqvarna BS501 Tracker 10Husqvarna BS501 Tracker 12 Husqvarna BS501 Tracker

 

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How to True a Motorcycle Wheel https://bikebrewers.com/true-motorcycle-wheel/ https://bikebrewers.com/true-motorcycle-wheel/#respond Sun, 12 Feb 2017 11:15:33 +0000 http://bikebrewers.com/?p=3012   In this article, I’ll try to explain how to true a motorcycle wheel. Got the spokes in place? Great! Not there yet? Read this article how to lace a motorcycle wheel. For some it may be dark art which only a few people can do, but I think it’s a job everybody can do with […]

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how to true a motorcycle wheelIn this article, I’ll try to explain how to true a motorcycle wheel. Got the spokes in place? Great! Not there yet? Read this article how to lace a motorcycle wheel. For some it may be dark art which only a few people can do, but I think it’s a job everybody can do with the right knowledge, tools, practice and patience.

What you Need to True a Motorcycle Wheel

Before you start, make sure you have everything you need:

  • The wheel with the spokes in it
  • Truing stand with a pointer
  • Torque spoke wrench
  • Tape
  • Optional: Dial gauge as a pointer
  • Patience…

You can create yourself a truing stand for a few bucks with this handy guide: Build Motorcycle Truing Stand

This works just fine, but if you’re planning to true wheels more often you can just buy one on eBay or Amazon (I use a Tusk truing stand).

Truing the Motorcycle Wheel

Everything in place? Cool! Let’s start truing the wheel! Before we start, keep in mind that for the truing process you have to think in the opposite direction: adjusting spokes on one side will have an effect on the alignment on the opposite side. I’ll explain this below with schematic images.

Give the wheel a spin in order to see how much “run-out” the wheel has. There are two types of runout: vertical and horizontal. We talk about a vertical run-out when the wheel is moving up and down when spinning around. The sideways movement of the wheel is called the horizontal run-out. In this article I’m working with a maximum tolerance of 1/16 of an inch (about 1,5mm). This is the maximum deviation my wheel can handle. Check your workshop manual or search the internet for the tolerance of your wheel.

In the most cases, a simple pointer will do the job to get the wheel within the maximum tolerance. If you really want to fine-tune the wheel you could use a dial gauge. But this isn’t necessary for most wheels.

Vertical alignment

vertical run-outSo we start with the vertical alignment of the wheel. Set the pointer of your truing stand in a position where you can measure the space between the pointer and the top side rim as shown in the image. Give the wheel a (slow) spin in order to find the “high spot”. This is the position where the distance between the pointer and the rim is the smallest. Put some tape on this spot to mark it and start adjusting the spokes in the area which I’ve highlighted in the image below. But be careful: only make small adjustments at a time! Tighten or loosen the spokes with ⅛ to ¼ turn. Keep rotating the wheel slowly in order to see what’s happening with your high spot. If done correctly the high spot will disappear. Remove the tape and give the wheel another spin to look for a new high spot and repeat the steps. Keep repeating this process till the wheel has no vertical run-out (or at least no more than the tolerance that suits your bike).

The principle of moving the rim (or hub as you like) up and down is shown in the image below:

How to True a Motorcycle Wheel 2

Horizontal alignment

horizontal run-out

No vertical run-out? Great job! Let’s take a look at the horizontal ron-out. The process is pretty much the same as with the vertical run-out: set the pointer of your truing stand in a position where you can measure the space between the pointer and the side of the rim as shown in the image. Give the wheel a (slow) spin in order to find the “wide spot”. This is the position where the distance between the pointer and the rim is the smallest. Put some tape on this spot to mark it and start adjusting the spokes just as with the vertical alignment. Always work on three spokes at every side. So if you loosen three on one side, tighten the other three on the other side. Keep rotating the wheel slowly in order to see what’s happening with your wide spot. If done correctly the wide spot will disappear. Remove the tape and give the wheel another spin to look for a new high spot and repeat the steps. Keep repeating this process till the wheel has no vertical run-out.

The principle of moving the rim (or hub as you like) left and right is shown in the image below:

How to True a Motorcycle Wheel

Tighten the Spokes

No vertical or horizontal run-out? Alright! That was the hardest part of truing your motorcycle wheel. Give your wheel a nice spin to enjoy your true wheel. Now you only need to tighten the spokes.

Since the spokes all have the perfect distance, you need to make all adjustments evenly around the wheel, you don’t want to create a new run-out! Mark a starting spot with tape (I usually start at the valve) and start tightening the spokes. Since the wheel is true, it is extremely important to tighten all spokes evenly! Start with ¼ turn each. When tightening the spokes you work your way around the wheel in the following pattern: first tighten all nr. 1 spokes, then all nr. 2 spokes until you’ve tightened all spokes. See the image below:

spoke tightening

Alternatively, you could work with a pattern where you tighten every third spoke, in this case you start with nr.1, skip 2 spokes and tighten nr. 4, skip 2 spokes, tighten nr. 3 and so on. The theory behind this pattern is that it would allow the tension on both sides of the rim within the same revolution of the wheel.

Check for the Right Tension

After you’ve worked your way around the wheel all spokes will have some built-up tension in them and in order to relieve some stress you should “squeeze” the spokes together by hand. After squeezing them, check the tension on all spokes by “listening to them”. You can do this by tapping them with, for instance, a screwdriver. A tight spoke will make a nice “PING” sound, loose spokes will sound flat. The higher the ping sounds, the tighter the spoke. Tighten all spokes equally until all spokes will have a nice ping. After this process, it’s a good idea to check the runout again to be sure that the rim and hub are still in place.

And finally it’s time to check if the spokes actually have enough tension. Check your workshop manual for the exact tension to be sure that all spokes have enough tension. For this final step you need a spoke torque wrench, but make sure that you don’t actually turn the nipples, because that will result in a potential new runout!

And that’s it, you’ve actually trued your motorcycle wheel and it’s ready to get some rubber! Don’t forget to place a rubber strip in the rim that covers the nipples.

Video: How to True a Motorcycle Wheel

These are the plain and simple basics of truing a motorcycle wheel! Hope this helps and for your reference I’ve place a pretty clear video below containing all steps and instructions. Good luck!

 

 

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Custom Kawasaki W800 by Ellaspede https://bikebrewers.com/custom-kawasaki-w800/ https://bikebrewers.com/custom-kawasaki-w800/#respond Fri, 10 Feb 2017 00:14:00 +0000 http://bikebrewers.com/?p=4914 The Kawasaki W800 could be called an instant modern classic. No racer, but an easy goin’ cruiser: powered by a torquey 773cc parallel twin with that typical classic look and sound. While most of the time the modern classics of Triumph are an easy pick as a donor bike, the W800 is also a real great […]

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Kawasaki W800 Ellaspede

The Kawasaki W800 could be called an instant modern classic. No racer, but an easy goin’ cruiser: powered by a torquey 773cc parallel twin with that typical classic look and sound. While most of the time the modern classics of Triumph are an easy pick as a donor bike, the W800 is also a real great base to customize. I must say that I don’t see them that much, but I can remember this awesome W800 Scrambler by deBolex. So I was glad to find out that the Australian Ellaspede came up with this awesome custom W800, numbered “EB415”.

Kawasaki W800 Ellaspede 11

In the words of Ellaspede:

Kurt’s history also dates back to his grandfathers who both rode motorcycles. Although the love of bikes skipped a generation in his family, it was only natural that he’d enjoy time on two wheels.

Fast forward to the present and although they’re a great looking bike, Kurt’s W800 was destined to go under the knife. A tasteful build with some classic inspiration and subtle colour scheme was in order to make the most of what the Japanese manufacturer was already offering.

Kawasaki W800 Ellaspede 7 Kawasaki W800 Ellaspede 2

The usual items were attended to with the stock lights, indicators and mirrors making way for smaller aftermarket items.

The rear frame was shortened and a short custom seat made it’s way on in place of the original. Only intended to be a single seater, the pillion peg frame mounts were removed along with a number of other frame tabs to clean up the lines.

The front guard was cut down and modified to suit the new application and a custom steel rear guard was shaped up for the shorter rear end.

Lowering the headlight gives a more aggressive and streamlined look to most bikes and the W800 was no different. An Ellaspede W800 gauge lowering mount (available soon) also lowers the stock gauges into a more aesthetically pleasing position to fit with the lower headlight. LSL bars and aftermarket bar end mirrors complete the control area.

Kawasaki W800 Ellaspede 5 Kawasaki W800 Ellaspede 2 Kawasaki W800 Ellaspede 3 The engine now breathes through K&N pod filters and exhales through a full Remus exhaust system from Germany. An O2 bypass and power commander bump up the power to a respectable 56HP at the rear wheel.

The stock rims were powdercoated in slick black before Firestone Deluxe Champion tyres were wrapped on for that classic big tyre look.

The colour scheme was all-important to round out the theme of the bike. With a number of items dressed in black already, the bright silver provides the perfect contrast on the guards and tank. The dark ‘oxblood’ seat upholstery pops in the right amount of colour and is replicated on the vintage Kawasaki badge now sitting on the smoothed out tank.

Kawasaki W800 Ellaspede 4Kawasaki W800 Ellaspede 9

Given the W800 isn’t as popular as the late model British twin motorcycles, one could be forgiven for thinking that owning one in stock form would be individual enough. But as with all stock motorcycles there are trims and tweaks that can make the most of what the factory intended.

We certainly credit Kurt’s vision for this bike, knowing that with some classic plans and well thought out modifications it would turn into the impressively smooth and slimmed down W800 you see here.

Kawasaki W800 Ellaspede 10

This bike didn’t need to reinvent the wheel, like the Kawasaki designers it just drew on a little history to create what is a true representation of a ‘modern classic’.

Follow Ellaspede:

Website | Facebook | Instagram

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